Exclusive: Discussing the Future of Facebook and the Facebook Ecosystem with CEO Mark Zuckerberg

There’s no shortage of big initiatives going on at Facebook these days. We sat down with Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg this week to talk about the state and future of Facebook and its surrounding ecosystem.

Zuckerberg shared his thoughts on recent changes to the Facebook Platform, competitive dynamics he desires amongst developers, the surprising growth of the social games business on Facebook overall, his vision for Facebook Credits, market perceptions of Facebook’s revenue streams and overall revenue numbers, what the company learned from its period of serious interest in Twitter, and Facebook’s company culture around money.

Today, Facebook’s 1,400 employees are working on products to better serve and monetize its nearly 500 million monthly active users around the world – up from 150 million at the start of 2009. We estimate the company did between $600 to $700 million in revenues last year, and will see between $1 and $1.1 billion in overall revenues this year.

As Facebook’s business has grown, so has the Facebook Platform economy. Developers of social games on the Facebook Platform will earn hundreds of million of dollars in revenues in 2010, according to our Inside Virtual Goods: The Future of Social Gaming 2010 report, and tens of thousands of businesses are shifting more of their marketing efforts and dollars to build their Facebook presence.

Justin Smith: What’s the state of the platform right now, in terms of the alignment of incentives between developers and Facebook and users, compared to where it was just after the Platform launched a couple of years ago, and where you want it to be?

Mark Zuckerberg: There’s two parts of the Platform – there’s canvas and then everything outside of Facebook. The focus now is actually the latter – Connect and everything we’re doing with social plugins. We have an all hands meeting later today and I was just told that Connect is now on 1 million sites. That’s definitely an increasing focus, and the last two f8′s have been around that. But I think what you’re asking is about the canvas part.

There are two ways that apps get usage that really define the character of the application. One way is viral distribution – spreading to new people. The other is reengagement. Early on, the viral strength was so much, but there were really no channels for reengagement. So people were using viral channels to reengage people, and you basically had apps that were growing very quickly, and their best way to get a good user count was to get new users and churn through them. That really optimizes for apps that are very viral instead of apps that are high quality and that people want to reengage. So we intentionally weakened the viral channels recently, and intentionally strengthened reengagement with emails, so that there will be better apps. It’s going to be a long process, but I think it’s going reasonably well.

One of the things we did recently was rebalance around games. A lot of users like playing games, but a lot of users just hate games, and that made it a big challenge, because people who like playing games wanted to post updates about their farm or frontier or whatever to their stream. They want all their friends to see their updates, and they want to get all their friends’ updates, but people who don’t care about games want no updates. So we did some rebalancing so that if you aren’t a game player you’re getting less updates.

One of our goals that we have is to make it so that you have just as good of a chance to build a good game if you’re a standalone game shop as if you’re a part of a bigger conglomerate, like Zynga or EA. That is a long term thing, to make sure the market stays competitive around this. CrowdStar has grown pretty quickly in the last 6 months, from very small to now pretty big. That to me shows that it’s definitely not a one company market, and that’s what we’re looking for. A lot of what we’re working on is can a small company succeed in the space.

What do you think about how big the games business has become on the platform? You told me a couple of years ago soon after the Platform launched that you weren’t really thinking about games when you built the Platform.

I was surprised, I was surprised about games. I had a conversation with some folks at Apple at one point, and they were surprised that games was the big thing on the iPhone too. I also heard anecdotally that the people making the first PC operating systems were surprised that games were that big too. So I think people build platforms for utilitarian purposes and then get surprised that games are a killer app, so I don’t think it’s uncommon. But clearly a lot of people like them.

Someone once wrote that I don’t like games, and I think that’s pretty silly. I don’t spend a lot of time playing games myself, but it’s really cool as a first proof example of an industry that’s getting completely disrupted by the whole social movement. All the dynamics of how you play the game, getting neighbors, trade with people, do tasks with people to more efficiently use your resources. It’s the first place where someone completely wove in social dynamics into the dynamics of the industry, and it works really well. The early games like Jetman and Boggle and things like that weren’t that social, but now when you hear gaming companies talk about the next generation of games that they’re creating, everything is about integrating the social stuff more and more deeply into the game.

Now, there are companies like Zynga, EA/Playfish, CrowdStar, but then there’s a Facebook version of Civilization as well, so it’s going in both directions. The Civ game is your traditional high quality game, but the big question there is whether they leverage social dynamics enough. The risk for them is that it might just end up being a good traditional game with very little social integration.

One of the questions that people I talk to have these days is what role Credits will have in the future of the company. How important is Credits in terms of your overall product priorities, do you think it will succeed, and how important will it be in terms of revenue?

It makes sense that there should be one currency. If I go play a CrowdStar game right now and get Credits there, I can’t go use those Credits in a Zynga game, so that kind of sucks. One of the biggest inefficiencies in buying virtual goods is all the friction of having to take your credit card out, so having one store of [virtual currency] that you can use everywhere is both good for users and good for all the apps.

The other thing about Credits from our business perspective is that payments and Credits is a significantly lower margin business than ads. Ads are 20%, 30%, 40%. A lot of people are skeptical of when we say we are doing this primarily for the developer ecosystem, but that’s really how we think about it. A lot of the apps so far are games, a lot of games monetize a lot better through virtual goods than through ads, and a big goal for us is to build this level ecosystem. So if Zynga or any one player can allow cross payments within their games, but that doesn’t extend to other games, then that ends up being a big barrier to entry for other startups. Making it so that there is one currency that people can take everywhere levels the playing field a bit, which is good.

We want to make it as easy as possible for users to build up a liquidity of Credits themselves, so we’re planning on pouring all the money that we make on Credits back into things like different offers or cards that people can buy in stores, to lubricate the economy so people will buy more stuff in apps. Overall we think it’s better for everyone for us to be in that place. Now if we fail, we fail, and someone else will succeed. But I think that over the long term this will end up being a pretty valuable thing.

When we spoke in the spring of 2009, you said you felt like there were misperceptions in the market around Facebook’s revenues, and soon thereafter you guys released some financial data points to adjust people’s expectations. Do you think that expectations today are more accurate? We estimate your 2010 revenues at $1 to $1.1 billion.

I think it’s really hard to predict this stuff. The biggest driver for revenues and costs for us is the number of users. Last year, we went from 150 to 350 million users – how could you predict that? Over a longer time horizon, it doesn’t matter that much. For how early social media is, you want to be looking at longer trends. You can have blips over a six month or one year period, but it doesn’t necesarily say that much.

The reason we corrected it last year is because it was hurting us. People thought it was too low. Now what I would say is that the estimates are not so far off in either direction that it’s causing us any pain, so we feel no need to correct it. Also, if it was too high, we would want to correct it too, because we don’t want expectations to be too high and we don’t want people to be disappointed if they joined. I think people are getting a better feel for it, but in general I think people underestimate the value of the whole thing.

There was a time over the last year and a half when you and the company became more engaged with Twitter, and then there was a time when you weren’t. What did you learn from that?

At first I think we learned that they do a lot of things really well. It’s a very nice, simple service. They do one thing really well – that’s powerful.

I think the main thing was we looked at their growth rate and – well, we saw our exponential growth rate continue for a very long period of time, and it still does at a super-linear rate, though not quite 3% a week any more. I looked at their rate and thought if this continues for 12 months or 18 months, then in a year they’re going to be bigger than us. I guess I extrapolated too much from our own experience of what was possible, but it just turned out that that their growth rate was kind of unnatural. They got a lot of media attention, and it grew very quickly for a little period of time.

Most of the lessons I take away from the whole thing now are that, as good as I think they are, I think I personally just paid too much attention to it. I don’t think we over-rotated as a company on it, but it was interesting because we’re a pretty young company, and we haven’t had that many other companies in our space. Learning how you work with other companies is an interesting thing that I’ll hopefully figure out over the next decade, and it was just interesting learning from watching them.

What particular product insights did you gain from that experience?

The way that people use the products are pretty different. It’s just interesting that they do some things that we explicitly don’t want to do, but do them well. For example, they don’t do real names, and they have themes. It’s a lot more around self expression than real identity, but I think it works for them. But that doesn’t mean we want to be that. Watching them is going to be really interesting over the next few years, and the same with FourSquare, and a lot of other social companies.

Can you talk any more about your plans for your location products?

Well, we’re developing something, but nothing besides that. We want to make sure that we do it well, and we’re taking the time to do that.

From what I’ve observed, it appears as though you’ve established a culture here that does not respect people who cash out early. Could you talk about the role that money plays in building the organization?

I guess we have a pretty utilitarian view towards money. Sometimes what I say gets misinterpreted as I don’t care about money, but that’s really not true. I think building a company is the best way to change the world, because it’s the best way to align the interests of a lot of smart people and a lot of partners to build something that’s great and that serves people. You can’t do that if you’re an individual, because it’s just you and there’s no one to align, and you can’t do it if you’re a non-profit, because you have no resources and you’re constantly out trying to raise money instead of generating it and being self-sufficient. That’s I guess the view.

At this point in the company’s evolution, I don’t see a huge need for the company to be throwing off a huge amount of profit. What’s the point? If we believe that we can build a lot more value for users, developers, and advertisers by taking any excess money we can make and investing it back in, then we’re just going to grow those communities and markets faster, and we’re going to end up with greater potential in the long run. If you prematurely optimize, you might get a bigger piece of a smaller thing. I feel like we’re really early on in the start of this movement toward everything being social.

But even people who are very smart, a lot of times throughout the history of the company, have underestimated how far it would go. That’s been difficult, because when you have key people who have that attitude, it’s hard to get stuff done. Especially around selling the company early on and choosing not to do that – that was a big learning moment for the company in terms of what kind of people we wanted to have here. I just want the people we have here to be focused on building stuff, and that’s how we run it.

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67 Responses to “Exclusive: Discussing the Future of Facebook and the Facebook Ecosystem with CEO Mark Zuckerberg”

  1. Mark Zuckerberg Thinks Twitter’s Exponential Growth Is Over says:

    [...] good friends over at InsideFacebook got time to talk with Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg about the social media giant. In that conversation, Twitter [...]

  2. SearchCap: The Day In Search, June 22, 2010 says:

    [...] Exclusive: Discussing the Future of Facebook and the Facebook Ecosystem with CEO Mark Zuckerberg, Inside Facebook [...]

  3. Bonnie says:

    I’d love to hear more about the future of Business pages.

    What is FaceBook doing to make Business pages more user-friendly? Has making the change from “Fan” to “Like” made much of a difference? (I personally prefer “Royal Subject”)

    I’d like to see Businesses able to post & interact the same as an individual. What is the likelihood of that happening?

    Having a business page attached to a profile gets confusing for those of us that want to keep our business separate from our personal profile.

  4. Gaith says:

    I like these quotes:

    “I think building a company is the best way to change the world,

    ou can’t do that if you’re an individual, because it’s just you and there’s no one to align

    you can’t do it if you’re a non-profit, because you have no resources and you’re constantly out trying to raise money instead of generating it and being self-sufficient.”

  5. Ferodynamics says:

    You can’t ask any difficult questions because he owns your domain name.

  6. ザッカーバーグ、Twitterを「気にしすぎていた」ことを認める says:

    [...] 今日(米国時間6/22)午前、Inside Facebookが、Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerbergと同社の現状に関するすばらしいインタビュー記事を載せた。これは、プラットホームやゲーム、そして同社の財務状態を考える上で通読に値する記事である。しかし、特に私の目に止まったのは、彼のTwitterに対する思いだった。 [...]

  7. francis says:

    Would it be safe to “CRAPS” or is it still to early, DANG… whos got my wallet?

  8. Facebook Platform « Raja Jasti’s Blog - Renaissance Thinking says:

    [...] now makes around $1B per year in revenues. So is Zynga who develops social games on Facebook. I would say [...]

  9. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg on Games, Connect and Credits says:

    [...] More specifically, Zuckerberg shared thoughts on the application platform, developers, games, Credits, Twitter and more. Below is a small excerpt that game developers may find interesting — but feel free to head over to our sister blog for the whole interview. [...]

  10. ravi says:

    I think Facebook has already changed the world!

  11. Zuckerberg on Optimizing Revenue Too Early — My Thoughts on Microfinance, Life, Web 2.0, Blogging, and Business says:

    [...] [via Inside Facebook] 0 Comments [...]

  12. Discussing the Future of Facebook With CEO Mark Zuckerberg | Justin Smith | Voices | AllThingsD says:

    [...] Read the rest of this post on the original site » Tagged: Facebook, Voices | permalink Sphere.Inline.search("", "http://voices.allthingsd.com/20100623/discussing-the-future-of-facebook-with-ceo-mark-zuckerberg/"); « Previous Post Next Post » ord=Math.random()*10000000000000000; document.write(''); [...]

  13. Web Trends Nigeria » Interview with Facebook founder, inspiration for startups says:

    [...] The interview was conducted by InsideFacebook.com; you can read the full interview here. [...]

  14. Mark Zuckerberg cree que el crecimiento exponencial de Twitter se parará says:

    [...] por @javig el Junio 23, 2010. En una entrevista para Inside Facebook, Mark Zuckerberg, fundador y CEO de Facebook fue preguntado por qué han aprendido sobre [...]

  15. Letsgosocial.nl » Blog Archive » Facebook: één munteenheid in games en apps says:

    [...] het artikel op Inside Facebook. AKPC_IDS += [...]

  16. Mark Zuckerberg o biznesie Facebooka « Spider's Web says:

    [...] z AllThingsDigit, później jeździł po Europie i opowiadał o planach Facebooka, a wczoraj udzielił ciekawego wywiadu własnym siłom PR. Warto na niego spojrzeć, bo sporo tam ciekawych informacji, sugestii i wynurzeń najmłodszego [...]

  17. Letsgosocial.nl » Blog Archive » 1 miljard dollar omzet voor Facebook in 2010 says:

    [...] het artikel op Facebook Inside. AKPC_IDS += [...]

  18. Zuckerberg über Twitter und Foursquare | Der Krawatteneisbär says:

    [...] [...]

  19. Zuckerberg: Facebook Will Hit 1 Billion Users (One Day) | Peter Kafka | MediaMemo | AllThingsD says:

    [...] if you want a really deep dive with Zuckerberg, check out Inside Facebook’s recent Q&A. Print SHARETHIS.addEntry({ title: "Zuckerberg: Facebook Will Hit 1 Billion Users (One Day)", [...]

  20. Dave S says:

    The credits question you posed was answered partially. A big concern that small, and maybe all, developers have is they have to double down with Facebook to grow and monetize their apps/games. If a developer has to purchase hundreds of thousands of dollars or millions of dollars worth of ads to grow their audience to a decent size to get a healthy conversion rate of purchasers and then also shares 30% of credits revenue with Facebook 30% the biz model becomes very tricky. This is especially true for small developers, and even more tricky if higher quality (bigger budgets, IP license fees, etc) is what will win the game.

    Certainly, margins on ads may be bigger than credits, but the two revenue sources take a good share of potential profits away from developers.

  21. pankit says:

    yup…facebook is taking over…gotta give major props to zuckerberg for not giving up control of the company though…

    I’ve written more on how your Avatar (Read:Facebook) will change how you.

    http://witstroll.wordpress.com/2010/04/21/your-avatar-teaches-you%e2%80%a6the-internet-takeover/

  22. Sharath Chandra says:

    Yeah, hope to find more at the sister blog, The changes in facebook using “like” and other convenient apps are wonderful, keep it up!

  23. Facebook: Der entspannte Mr. Zuckerberg | Basic Thinking says:

    [...] hat er dem Blog Inside Facebook ein exklusives Interview gegeben und dort ist nichts zu spüren von Zurückhaltung oder gar einem Zurückrudern [...]

  24. Raph’s Website » Zuckerberg talks games says:

    [...] Inside Social Games has an interview with Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg. There are a couple of things there that discuss their games strategy. A few sample quotes specific to games are below, but the whole thing is worth reading. [...]

  25. Facebook looks to emerging markets to boost users to 1bn | Beyond Brics | FT.com says:

    [...] Facebook’s pace of acquiring users has been lumpy, Mr Zuckerberg said, in response to recent reports of tapering growth online. [...]

  26. Facebook Abandons Twitterization | Enbeeone3 : A Freelancer says:

    [...] to a fascinating interview with Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg this week on Inside Facebook (Discussing the Future of Facebook and the Facebook Ecosystem with CEO Mark Zuckerberg), Facebook admits that they may have focused too much on trying to emulate Twitter, the [...]

  27. Facebook Founder Mark Zuckerberg Thinks Twitter Is Cute says:

    [...] words, not his. In a new interview the 26-year old who sits at the top of the company that employs 1,400 people and is on pace to [...]

  28. Zuckerberg: Facebook-Integration bereits auf 1 Million Sites says:

    [...] aber sehr lesenswertes Interview mit Facebook-CEO Mark Zuckerberg auf Inside Facebook. Ein paar [...]

  29. New Mini-Battle Emerges Between Twitter And Facebook says:

    [...] person who announced the feature, used to work at Facebook. Interestingly enough, Mark Zuckerberg told Justin Smith the other day that he spent too much time focused on Twitter. Here’s the exact statement he [...]

  30. Playmage says:

    If Facebook only wanted to reduce virility and keep re-engagement channels, then they should have kept notification working for app-user->app-user and game->app-user instead of killing it completely. Emails, dashboard, counters are all ineffective replacements for long term re-engagement.

  31. La de Zuckerberg es más grande | Con noticias de Facebook says:

    [...] declaraciones las realizó para Inside Facebook, donde, como ya hemos comentado al principio, tiene palabras para la red del microblogging, de la [...]

  32. links for 2010-06-24 « Where is my towel? says:

    [...] Exclusive: Discussing the Future of Facebook and the Facebook Ecosystem with CEO Mark Zuckerberg sog: ome interesting points raised about virtual currency, location @ facebook, investment strategy, growth/revenue, fb vs twitter etc.v (tags: twitter facebook foursquare location virtual money *****) [...]

  33. Fm Norte 1007 » El fundador de Facebook «se mofa» del crecimiento de Twitter says:

    [...] no tiene reparos a la hora de valorar el crecimiento de Twitter. En una entrevista publicada por Inside Facebook, Mark Zuckerberg ha asegurado que la expansión que ha experimentado la plataforma de microblogging [...]

  34. Mark Zuckerberg dice que el crecimiento de Twitter se va a frenar says:

    [...] de Internet actualmente, por ser el dueño de la red social más grande del mundo. Y desde el blog Inside Facebook han tenido la oportunidad de entrevistarlo en relación a diferentes temas, entre los cuales [...]

  35. Zuckerberg en Inside Facebook | Facebook en español says:

    [...] El porqué de esta última irónica y sarcástica frase en la entrevista completa: Mark Zuckerberg en Inside Facebook. [...]

  36. Facebook націлився на Росію та Китай | Watcher says:

    [...] інтерв’ю блогу Inside Facebook засновник соціальної мережі Марк Цукерберг заявив, що [...]

  37. Mark Zuckerberg: El crecimiento de Twitter se frenara - Estufas Etanol says:

    [...] de Internet actualmente, por ser el dueño de la red social más grande del mundo. Y desde el blog Inside Facebook han tenido la oportunidad de entrevistarlo en relación a diferentes temas, entre los cuales [...]

  38. The first 500 million is always the easiest | Social Media Influence says:

    [...] “We saw our exponential growth rate continue for a very long period of time, and it still does at a super-linear rate, though not quite 3 per cent a week any more,” Zuckerberg told Inside Facebook. [...]

  39. EL fundador de Facebook ” se mofa ” del crecimiento de twitter | Ynryd.com says:

    [...] no tiene reparos a la hora de valorar el crecimiento de Twitter. En una entrevista publicada por Inside Facebook, Mark Zuckerberg ha asegurado que la expansión que ha experimentado la plataforma de microblogging [...]

  40. Why Facebook wants you to believe that “email is dead” says:

    [...] to dismiss other communication means. It is in the same vein of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg saying about Twitter that “[…], as good as I think they are, I think I personally just paid too much [...]

  41. Surunga » Twitter y Facebook tienen un encontronazo says:

    [...] decía haber prestado “demasiada atención” a Twitter en un principio. En una entrevista durante su gira europea, el directivo dijo haberse sentido intimidado por el ritmo de crecimiento [...]

  42. Facebook vs. Twitter, la diferencia de imagen | Arquematics says:

    [...] una entrevista que concedió recientemente el CEO de Facebook Mark Zuckerberg, fue preguntado sobre el rápido [...]

  43. Internet Evolution - Robert McGarvey - Zynga Draws Record VC Funding says:

    [...] annoyance with Zynga's games. They definitely aren't core to Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg's vision for the [...]

  44. forex robot says:

    Keep posting stuff like this i really like it

  45. Zynga and the success of social gaming - Digitally Approved says:

    [...] Zynga’s games. They definitely aren’t core to Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg’s vision for the [...]

  46. Blog de 4r Soluciones » El fundador de Facebook le resta importancia a Twitter says:

    [...] al servicio que ofrecen”, remarcó el ejecutivo en una entrevista que le realizó el sitio web Inside Facebook [...]

  47. Ann says:

    I don’t think I will be taking advice on the best way to save the world from a 26 y/o geek who may know a few things about social networks (even though FB can’t get their act together on the privacy issues, changing it every other day).

    Businesses may have the money and resources, but they – like Facebook – are all too concerned with making money and keeping it, rather than non-profits, who are trying to raise money not to line their own pockets, Mr. Zuckerberg, but to actually help those in need and truly make the world a better place. Businesses that are doing well, have a corporate responsibility to society, but they aren’t in the business to help the world.

  48. JA says:

    “I don’t think I will be taking advice on the best way to save the world from a 26 y/o geek who may know a few things about social networks (even though FB can’t get their act together on the privacy issues, changing it every other day).

    Businesses may have the money and resources, but they – like Facebook – are all too concerned with making money and keeping it, rather than non-profits, who are trying to raise money not to line their own pockets, Mr. Zuckerberg, but to actually help those in need and truly make the world a better place. Businesses that are doing well, have a corporate responsibility to society, but they aren’t in the business to help the world.”

    Ditto. How self-important and self-righteous can Zuckerberg be?

  49. Ward Tipton says:

    Actually, some Non-Profits are fully self-sustaining once they are established. I believe that I am qualified to say this being the founding member and the Administrator of just such a Non-Profit group. Actually, our Business Model is relatively new for non-profits but it is in actuality, based on the Business Model for an Inc. so it really is nothing new. Dare I say, the business model for the non-profit is much more popular than the FaceBook Page for my Non-Profit organization.

  50. Services, Information, People | b r a n t s says:

    [...] to someone on FB from GMail (yes, I have FB friends who I don’t connect with on GTalk) In a recent interview, Mark Zuckerberg also shared his views on credits, and its portability. With search and location [...]

  51. CEP | Wall Street Saves the World! | The Center for Effective Philanthropy says:

    [...] that’s great and that serves people,” Mr. Zuckerberg said in an interview on the blog Inside Facebook. “You can’t do that if you’re an individual because it’s just you and there’s no one [...]

  52. Twitter y Facebook tienen un encontronazo « TrucosBlackberry's Blog says:

    [...] decía haber prestado “demasiada atención” a Twitter en un principio. En una entrevistadurante su gira europea, el directivo dijo haberse sentido intimidado por el ritmo de crecimiento [...]

  53. The first 500 million is always the easiest | SMI says:

    [...] “We saw our exponential growth rate continue for a very long period of time, and it still does at a super-linear rate, though not quite 3 per cent a week any more,” Zuckerberg told Inside Facebook. [...]

  54. Stand Up and Speak Out, Nonprofit Communicators – Nonprofits Are Getting Dissed | Nonprofit Marketing | Getting Attention says:

    [...] Mike Zuckerberg, the founder of Facebook, bluntly stated (his modus operendi) that nonprofits don’t have the power to change the world because they [...]

  55. Writingprincess says:

    Here’s a note to Zuckerberg – My mother once told me that if I didn’t know something about a topic that I shouldn’t speak about it. Your comments about nonprofits obviously show that you know nothing about the nonprofit industry. They’re quite laughable really, and steeped in ignorance. There are nonprofits who make more money than Facebook and who have outlasted every new startup to come down the pike. To say they don’t have sustainable business models is, quite frankly, humorous. I’d like to see the Facebook brand in say, oh 100 years, like the Salvation Army or the YMCA brands which have been around for centuries plus. Opening a business is a way to change the world alright thank you cotton industry for bringing slavery to the U.S. and insurance industry for protecting the property formerly known as people, oh and really love the meat packing industry for introducing us to child labor ala The Jungle, or oil industry for adding such a nice sheen to our Gulf coast, shall I go on about the sustainable, good vibes of businesses and how great they are for the world. A little one sided on my view right? Well so are you when it comes to nonprofits. Not all nonprofits are unsustainable, inefficient and low on impact just like not all business are good for the life, love and the pursuit of happiness. It takes a lovely mix of both which is why I’m glad the technocrats who think they rule the universe with their 1′s and 0′s still have to contend with the human brain and its ability to absorb history, reality and fantasy and know the difference. Stick to what you know Z, whatever that is.

  56. facebook templates says:

    Sometimes I think Mark don’t know what is he doing and what should he do next. His only IDEAlogical time was when he get that idea from twins and make a facebook then some good guys start investing their money.

  57. Fidel says:

    Присоединяюсь. Это было и со мной. Можем пообщаться на эту тему. Здесь или в PM.

  58. Why Google Has No Game says:

    [...] not into social games. That’s right, half of Facebook users don’t play games, and many users hate games. Plus, the whole gaming ecosystem feels like it’s about to collapse on itself. It’s no [...]

  59. Frivolous mediums evolve – so will social games says:

    [...] are just not into social games. That’s right, half of Facebook users don’t play games, and many users hate games. Plus, the whole gaming ecosystem feels like it’s about to collapse on itself. It’s no wonder [...]

  60. Does Facebook Still Have Some Twitter Envy? « says:

    [...] be a sure sign that Facebook is suffering from severe Twitter envy (something CEO Mark Zuckerberg has admitted experiencing in the [...]

  61. Facebook: Social Games Revolution 2010 | Como empiezo hoy says:

    [...] hace relativamente muy poco (un par se semanas atras mientras estaba de vacaciones) un articulo en webtrends sobre el futuro de Facebook y la revolucion en el mercado en termino de beneficios bajo la [...]

  62. Debunking the Myths About Facebook’s Stock Split: Tech News « says:

    [...] financial details. But I also respect common sense, which tells me that a company making $1 billion in revenue this year can in no rational way be valued at $30 billion right now. And besides, valuing a private company [...]

  63. The life cycle of Social Networks « In a Social World says:

    [...] Ivy leagues. It gradually opened up to universities the world over, and then came Facebook’s vision of connecting the entire [...]

  64. КОНТАКТ - Агенція комунікаційних технологій | КОНТАКТ says:

    [...] Цукерберг каже про своє творіння, в якому є 500 мільйонів споживачів [...]

  65. Facebook ‘blocks’ Twitter friend finder | Dr. G on Facebook says:

    [...] site.Separately, Zuckerberg, in an interview published earlier this week by Inside Facebook, a news site dedicated to the social network, admitted that he had initially [...]

  66. Twitter And Facebook Work To Fix Twitter-Facebook Sync - AllFacebook says:

    [...] person who announced the feature, used to work at Facebook. Interestingly enough, Mark Zuckerberg told Justin Smith the other day that he spent too much time focused on Twitter. Here’s the exact statement he [...]

  67. How a $10,000 Bet on Facebook’s IPO Looks One Year Later says:

    [...] “At this point in the company’s evolution, I don’t see a huge need for the company to be throwing off a huge amount of profit. What’s the point? If we believe that we can build a lot more value for users, developers, and advertisers by taking any excess money we can make and investing it back in, then we’re just going to grow those communities and markets faster, and we’re going to end up with greater potential in the long run.” – Inside Facebook [...]

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