Facebook’s “In-House Sociologist” Shares Stats on Users’ Social Behavior

dunbar_circlesThe famous Dunbar number, or “theoretical cognitive limit to the number of people with whom one can maintain stable social relationships”, is generally accepted to be about 150. However, in a recent interview with The Economist, Cameron Marlow, a research scientist at Facebook, shared some interesting stats on Facebook users’ social behavior patterns.

His findings: while many people have hundreds friends on Facebook, they still only actively communicate with a small few. Or to quote the author of the article, “Humans may be advertising themselves more efficiently. But they still have the same small circles of intimacy as ever.”

Here’s the data from Marlow:

The average male Facebook user with 120 friends:

  • Leaves comments on 7 friends’ photos, status updates, or wall
  • Messages or chats with 4 friends

The average female Facebook user with 120 friends:

  • Leaves comments on 10 friends’ photos, status updates, or wall
  • Messages or chats with 6 friends

The average male Facebook user with 500 friends:

  • Leaves comments on 17 friends’ photos, status updates, or wall
  • Messages or chats with 10 friends

The average female Facebook user with 500 friends:

  • Leaves comments on 26 friends’ photos, status updates, or wall
  • Messages or chats with 16 friends

In other words, Facebook users comment on stuff from only about 5-10% of their Facebook friends. And as has been shown by many other studies, women communicate with more people in all cases than men.

“People who are members of online social networks are not so much ‘networking’ as they are ‘broadcasting their lives to an outer tier of acquaintances who aren’t necessarily inside the Dunbar circle,’” Lee Rainie, the director of the Pew Internet & American Life Project, says.

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117 Responses to “Facebook’s “In-House Sociologist” Shares Stats on Users’ Social Behavior”

  1. Defining Social with Usage Data : Beyond Search says:

    [...] “Facebook’s In House Sociologist Shares Stats on Users’ Social Behavior” here sheds some light on what makes Facebookers tick. As with any statistical summary, one must consider [...]

  2. ViNT // Vision - Inspiration - Navigation - Trends » Primates on Facebook says:

    [...] hier, hier en [...]

  3. Rodney Gagnon says:

    If we stopped and observed our ‘real world’ behavior, these stats still hold true. I can’t remember ever saying, “Gee, I wish I had more ‘friends’”. So, even though this data is interesting, I don’t find it especially enlightening. This relates to Strong vs Weak social ties. I tried to express some thoughts here, http://corporate.kayanta.com/index.php/58-Test.html.

    I am also a fan of this type of data. Thanks for sharing.

    -Rodney

  4. Comments on the Scalability of Facebook’s Social Behavior « Informal Brain says:

    [...] via Facebook’s “In-House Sociologist” Shares Stats on Users’ Social Behavior . [...]

  5. Julien says:

    This is indeed a question of strong and weak ties, and the question would rather be in which intervals of time (and during which periods) Facebook users communicate with certain friends.

    The usage of Facebook will also differ between the users, some replacing other (online) communication means completely by using this platform while other will combine different social media for their weak and strong relations.

    In addition, Facebook can also replace some traditional interactive communication: If I enter my status so that all my “friends” can see it, this information might be enough for a large number of persons. Instead of asking how another person feels or what s/he does I just look at his status, reducing the amount of visible information exchange (communication).

    Altogether I would agree with Rodney that these figures – although interesting – are not really surprising.

  6. Ashu says:

    So very true!

    But I do not have such a scewed ratio ;)

    Friends: 35

    Leave comments on: 7

    Messages: 4

  7. E.J. says:

    I agree with Rodney. This isn’t really new information, but reinforces what sociologists have been saying about online interaction for some time: that it reflects and heightens so-called “real life” relationships. It may be news for people (I’m thinking my over-30 peers) who still view social networking as somehow replacing how we interact in f2f.

  8. Bertil Hatt says:

    Those figures were interesting, but he did not say how many of those 4/6/10/17/26 friends also ping each other, or whether they had the same number of friends.

  9. Writing on the wall | Likelihood of Success says:

    [...] From the Inside Facebook blog: “People who are members of online social networks are not so much ‘networking’ as they are ‘broadcasting their lives to an outer tier of acquaintances who aren’t necessarily inside the Dunbar circle,’” Lee Rainie, the director of the Pew Internet & American Life Project, says. [...]

  10. Joseph Hsu says:

    Thanks, this is all very relevant to what I’m learning in my Interpersonal Communication class.

    re: Lee Rainie’s comment
    when users are broadcasting, others comment which can lead to relationships. Isn’t that network?

  11. Carlos Lorenzo says:

    Although these stats overlook certain variables they do give a general idea. I would say with a little more incentive to share and talk, I would expand my circle of friends on FB but I prefer the real world in which I have much more than 10 friends. Considering the fact that each of my friends might think the same it is quite probable that communication is scarce in my circle.

  12. Dunbar Lives! | The Noisy Channel says:

    [...] out that Facebook’s own “in-house sociologist” Cameron Marlow has documented a similar phenomenon on Facebook: The average male Facebook user with 120 [...]

  13. Facebook and The Metrics Of Friends | Usability Counts | User Experience, Social Media says:

    [...] Inside Facebook as summarized from The [...]

  14. How many friends can you have? « Handwaving says:

    [...] from Facebook, who has analyzed how people socialize on Facebook. The numbers are better summarized here. The key point is that people appear to have a close relationship (measured by regular [...]

  15. Jon DiPietro says:

    Those numbers are a commentary about technology adoption and not a Dunbar Number, in my opinion. It’s consistent with participation rates for most social networking technologies – roughly 10% of users generate 90% of the traffic/content. My hypothesis is that if participation rates were higher, then the Dunbar circle would be much larger. I think there’s little if anything in those numbers that speaks to social behavior.

  16. Kaila Strong | Vertical Measures says:

    I think this information is very interesting, and consistent with what I’ve learned from other Facebook users. I make it a point to ask my friends how they utilize their Facebook in an effort to assist me with my social media for clients and my employer Vertical Measures.

  17. Graham Jones - Internet Psychologist says:

    While the figures make perfect sense, we should realise these are averages that do not take into account age differences. You can expect teenagers to be much more active on Facebook and the older participants less so. Equally, these averages must take into account the “lurkers” who do nothing, so I suspect these averages are actually much lower than the true picture for mainstream users of Facebook. As ever, averages are helpful, but do not really tell us that much.

  18. Roger says:

    I blogged about the point of diminishing returns in terms of number of friends and Dunbar’s Number on January 6. http://www.twitterthoughts.com/social-media-news-analyses/2009/1/6/the-point-of-diminishing-returns-lessons-from-biology.html

  19. Steve Trefethen says:

    This seems to match what I see between my wife and I though both of us have found the total number of people we communicate has expanded somewhat. We both have reconnected with old friends, some of whom stay more “in the mix” on a day-to-day via Facebook than they ever did over the phone, email, IM or otherwise.

  20. Chimps Have Less Friends Than Humans on Facebook | The Minority Report says:

    [...] Facebook’s “In-House Sociologist” Shares Stats on Users’ Social Behavior [...]

  21. The Facebook Generational Divide « Boldmouth’s Weblog says:

    [...] Facebook Generational Divide Posted on February 27, 2009 by Katie Today’s post on the Inside Facebook blog got me thinking about how Facebook users’ behaviors vary based on [...]

  22. Pete says:

    uh, it’s been obvious for some time that fb and other social networking companies don’t get how social networks really work. They constantly promote adding more connections between individuals as opposed to identifying/enriching/protecting the meaningful ones that already exist. This is Soc. 101 stuff. Go read Barabisi’s Linked.

  23. Coturnix says:

    I wrote about this recently:
    http://scienceblogs.com/clock/2009/02/the_evolution_of_facebook.php
    and we had a discussion of your post on FriendFeed:
    http://friendfeed.com/e/2ecbd460-abec-4e9e-a1e3-06a55f51d59c/Facebook-s-In-House-Sociologist-Shares-Stats-on/

  24. KZ says:

    notice also that women do these things more than men. in all aspects. women are MORE social than men.

  25. Le teorie della psicologia cognitiva applicate a Facebook | RaccoltaBlog says:

    [...] Via | Insidefacebook.com [...]

  26. A Collection of Social Network Stats for 2009 says:

    [...] those that have over 100 friends, most only communicate with a smaller subset of friends, and the rest is broadcasting to others. Now there’s not enough data presented to see if if content actually can still spread across [...]

  27. Tom Foremski says:

    Over what time period are users posting/interacting? Per day? Per week?
    It shows that the larger your group the more you have to interact. You see that with top bloggers/social media personalities, they never stop interacting. Not every one can do that, you have to “hyper-social.”

  28. Los amigos de Dunbar en Facebook | Ideágora says:

    [...] seríamos capaces de vencer esta limitación y llegar a gestionar ingentes cantidades de amigos. Veo en Inside Facebook un post que hace referencia a una artículo publicado en The Economist los señores de Facebook han hecho [...]

  29. Kevin Pruett says:

    “…Broadcasting their lives…” is the key point to take away from this study. This in-depth look at user behavior shows that a person’s network is very much a compilation of activity streams; despite the fact that we may only interact within a ‘smaller circle’ of friends, users enjoy the content and data extrapolated from a wide network.

  30. Suzanne Lainson says:

    What isn’t being explored, by these numbers alone, is the level of reciprocal interaction.

    In some cases you invite people on Facebook to be friends in hopes that a deeper relationship will be formed. And perhaps you start out by sending messages, comments, etc. If there is little or no response, you don’t bother again.

    In other cases, you are may be very close, but don’t exchange many messages. For example, if your close relatives are your Facebook friends, you may not bother to exchange comment when you’ll be talking to them on the phone or seeing them in person. Or you may not want to add social comments if you are using Facebook primarily for business networking.

  31. Primates on Facebook « The Hannibal Blog says:

    [...] the possible bio-sociological conclusions to be drawn from Facebook data. A few examples are here, here, here, here and [...]

  32. Andreas says:

    If any of you want to see the charts that I used to research my piece (I’m the author of that article in The Economist), they are here.

  33. Facebook’s “In-House Sociologist” Shares Stats on Users’ Social Behavior « Ali Unlu says:

    [...] http://www.insidefacebook.com [...]

  34. Suzanne Lainson says:

    I also want to add is that the value in Facebook is the opportunity to stay in touch with people who you aren’t close to, either because of time, distance, or relationship.

    I have about 800 friends and actually read everything that turns up in the live feed. I like to look at all status updates, who has added friends, what links everyone is posting, and so on. Most of that stuff doesn’t warrant a comment from me, but it is a way to monitor on a continuing basis the lives of people I want to know about. That allows me some context when I do want to reach out to them. I could not do this via letters, phone calls, or meetings.

  35. Le teorie della psicologia cognitiva applicate a Facebook | 8legs says:

    [...] Via | Insidefacebook.com [...]

  36. Facebook sociologist shares stats on users social behaviour - Henriette Weber says:

    [...] It is a theory that I back, that people can only handle a certain amount of connections in a community – you might have 1000 friends but you only have a daily interaction with a dusin of them. a sociologist from facebook confirms that in this blogpost. [...]

  37. Lucy says:

    The figures were interesting

  38. links for 2009-02-28 - Kevin Bondelli’s Youth Vote Blog says:

    [...] Facebook’s “In-House Sociologist” Shares Stats on Users’ Social Behavior [...]

  39. we make our world small, caught on film, sec hotline compromised by politics « inkbluesky says:

    [...] listed, but only regularly engage in community activity with a small number of those friends, Facebook’s “In-House Sociologist” Shares Stats on Users’ Social Behavior The famous Dunbar number, or “theoretical cognitive limit to the number of people with whom one [...]

  40. Friedbeef says:

    These numbers are flawed in the sense that most people only leave comments and interacts with people which are featured on my newsfeed.

    Facebook does not feature all your friends, but uses an algorithm to determine who shows up on your newsfeed and how often. I guess by doing this, it helps bring some sanity because live feed data may become too overwhelming if you have too many friends.

    I know for a fact that if my newsfeed were updated more often, and featured more friends, I would definitely interact much more. Facebook unfortunately only offers full on live feeds and regular newsfeeds – nothing in between.

  41. Roundtrip » Lesestoff und News - 1. March 2009 says:

    [...] Facebook’s “In-House Sociologist” Shares Stats on Users’ Social Behavior [...]

  42. Dagens studie - ∴ Johan Loman says:

    [...] Facebooks hussociologer bekräftar det som många redan talat om och trott. Trots hundratals vänner interagerar såväl “typiska” män som kvinnor enbart med en liten krets av de som finns på kompislistan. Man talar inte längre om benämningen “nätverkande” utan snarare om “utsändningar” av det egna livet i form av foton, statusrader och liknande till ytterkanterna av de tidigare så omtalade Dunbar-cirkeln. [...]

  43. Facebook not a social network, but a broadcasting channel? says:

    [...] some interesting statistics about the social network’s users (source: The Economist, via InsideFacebook). The average male Facebook user with 120 [...]

  44. Your Facebook network is filled with people you don’t talk to says:

    [...] the data from Marlow (source: insidefacebook.com from an Economist [...]

  45. Facebook’s “In-House Sociologist” Shares Stats on Users’ Social Behavior | Biz Geek says:

    [...] via Facebook’s “In-House Sociologist” Shares Stats on Users’ Social Behavior. [...]

  46. links for 2009-03-02 | Ip's. says:

    [...] Facebook’s “In-House Sociologist” Shares Stats on Users’ Social Behavior "His findings: while many people have hundreds friends on Facebook, they still only actively communicate with a small few. Or to quote the author of the article, “Humans may be advertising themselves more efficiently. But they still have the same small circles of intimacy as ever.”" (tags: article facebook social sociology anthropology analysis) [...]

  47. Andrew Trent says:

    “uh, it’s been obvious for some time that fb and other social networking companies don’t get how social networks really work. They constantly promote adding more connections between individuals as opposed to identifying/enriching/protecting the meaningful ones that already exist. This is Soc. 101 stuff. Go read Barabisi’s Linked.”

    I think Facebook does a fine job of this. You don’t “meet people” or constantly add connections on Facebook, you already kow your friends. I only EVER use it to deepend and enrich existing connections, and I don’t see how it would be possible to use Facebook for anything else, unless you joined a lot of groups and were really active in them (but really, who is ACTIVE on Facebook groups?).

  48. funny you should ask » Bookmarks for February 21st through March 1st says:

    [...] Facebook’s “In-House Sociologist” Shares Stats on Users’ Social Behavior – Facebook stats from Facebook Sociologist. Dunbar 150 was interesting to hear. Much higher number of connections than 150, but only interact with 5-10% of them. More broadcast than interaction, and more adding than really communicating. [...]

  49. Facebook and Human Social Interaction « Social Consulting says:

    [...] expected, when a publication like the Economist writes an article about Facebook, people listen and people respond. The author noted on his own blog, “The point of the piece: to add a tiny bit to the [...]

  50. Facebook as a Broadcasting Mechanism and the Emergence of Weak Social Ties « Hunting Cows says:

    [...] pointed out in the article “Facebook’s “In-House Sociologist” Shares Stats on Users’ Social Behavior” (thank you Maryam for the wall post), there is a term called the Dunbar number, which [...]

  51. Weekly Digest of the Social Networking Space: March 4, 2009 says:

    [...] Facebook users only interact with a few Despite those that have over 100 friends, most only communicate with a smaller subset of friends, and the rest is broadcasting to others. Now there’s not enough data presented to see if if content actually can still spread across [...]

  52. How social media has changed the definition of friendship | burning the bacon with barrett says:

    [...] recently reported that most users who have hundreds of friends in reality only really interact with between 5-10% of [...]

  53. Tore Opsahl says:

    I have recently co-authored an article that deals with gender differences in an online community similar to Facebook. It is called “Patterns and Dynamics of Users’ Behavior and Interaction: Network Analysis of an Online Community” and is forthcoming in the Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology.

    http://toreopsahl.com/2009/03/06/article-patterns-and-dynamics-of-users-behaviour-and-interaction-network-analysis-of-an-online-community/

  54. Ian Armstrong says:

    I’ve written up something of an expansion on the ideas in this article here:

    http://huntingcows.com/2009/03/03/facebook-as-a-broadcasting-mechanism-and-the-emergence-of-weak-social-ties/

    Thanks to the author and commenters for further inspiration on a topic that started in my own facebook comments, led me here, then turned into a pretty epic post.

  55. Daily del.icio.us for February 27th through March 5th — Vinny Carpenter's blog says:

    [...] Facebook’s "In-House Sociologist" Shares Stats on Users’ Social Behavior – While many people have hundreds friends on Facebook, they still only communicate with a small few. Or to quote the author of the article, quot;Humans may be advertising themselves more efficiently. But they still have the same small circles of intimacy as ever.quot; [...]

  56. Dokąd zmierza Facebook? Co chce podpatrzeć od Myspace i Twittera? | mitu - marketing, internet, trendy, użytkownicy says:

    [...] Więcej informacji. Lepsze możliwość sortowania informacji w aktualnościach po różnych kryteriach. Dotychczasowe aktualności były podzielone na sekwencje, np. w jednym miejscu “5 Twoich znajomych zmieniło zdjęcia profilowe” (a przecież nie zrobili tego w 1 sekundzie). Nowe aktualności będą bardziej zbliżone do Twittera, czy Blipa, czyli pokazywanie tego co się dzieje w real time. Przeciętny użytkownik Facebooka chce wiedzieć co się dzieje tylko u 5-10% swoich znajomych. Bardzo ciekawe dane na temat tego do ilu znajomych się odzywamy, ilu znajomych komentujemy zdjęcia i do ilu piszemy możecie znaleźć tutaj. [...]

  57. Social Behavior on Facebook | The AIR Blog says:

    [...] Hat/Tip: InsideFaceboo.Com for the summary. [...]

  58. Mistä tunnet sä ystävän? : DAILY DIEGO says:

    [...] juuri, sanoo tuore tutkimus. Riippumatta “Facebook-frendien” määrästä yhteyttä pidetään vain harvoihin ja [...]

  59. When Social Networking is really Social “Broadcasting” « Pitaco 2.0 says:

    [...] 7, 2009 · No Comments This is somewhat well known but it’s good when a research confirms your feelings. People in Facebook actually interact with less than 10% of their Facebook [...]

  60. The Day’s Delicious | Patchchord.com says:

    [...] Facebook’s “In-House Sociologist” Shares Stats on Users’ Social Behavior: More proof for my thought that Facebook (like many other pockets of social media) represents the [...]

  61. Get Your Geek On : Wesley Donehue says:

    [...] Inside Facebook: Facebook’s “In-House Sociologist” Shares Stats on Users’ So… [...]

  62. 3 Social Networks facts « twistrends says:

    [...] Mensen blijven dus dezelfde intieme cirkel vrienden houden, maar adverteren zichzelf via social networks efficienter naar hun buitencirkel. Zie ook Dunbar’s Number. Bron: InsideFacebook [...]

  63. Social Voyeurism vs Real Ties « Media Update - The Blog says:

    [...] recently also read an interesting article by The Economist that looked at the actual limit to how many stable relationships humans can [...]

  64. More Details on User Communication Patterns from Facebook Data Team says:

    [...] weeks ago, Facebook’s “in house sociologist” Cameron Marlow shared interesting data with The Economist on Facebook users’ social behavior patterns – essentially, while Facebook [...]

  65. Youth and Grass Routes 10 March 09 | mobileYouth - youth marketing mobile culture research says:

    [...] (Web2Journal) * Facebook’s “In-House Sociologist” Shares Stats on Users’ Social Behavior (InsideFacebook) * 50 Youth Marketing Keywords You Need to Know (Slideshare) * Brandwidth – do you have it? [...]

  66. חורים ברשת » עמוד הבית » גלו לי סוד שמן, אינטימי says:

    [...] (מי אמר שאין מה לעשות עם תואר ראשון בסוציולוגיה?) אומר בראיון לאקונומיסט שלא רק שהרשתות החברתיות לא הרחיבו [...]

  67. Josh Damis says:

    Very interesting but not at all surprising. This stuff is always good too know when trying to determine how your audience actually uses social media.

  68. מסתבר שהחיים ממש ממש משעממים | הקולקטיב says:

    [...] שאני לא ממציא כלום. הסוציולוג הראשי של פייסבוק פרסם ממצאים מעניינים על הרשת הזו בשבוע שעבר: לרוב האנשים אין יותר מ [...]

  69. ::: Think Macro ::: » Reading blogs #14 says:

    [...] on Facebook” (via Inside Facebook via ICT4Peace) – On a related note, this is a glimpse at the social dynamics on FB; I wish there [...]

  70. Youth Trends 18 March 09 | mobileYouth - youth marketing mobile culture research says:

    [...] Touch (360blog) * Facebook’s “In-House Sociologist” Shares Stats on Users’ Social Behavior (insidefacebook) * Japanese “hate” for iPhone all a big mistake (Appleinsider) * Brandwidth – do you [...]

  71. M.Fairuz Ibrahim says:

    thanks for the valuable information.

    anyway i used FB for my Joint Management Body which help our comunity a tad.

  72. LETLIVE » The Sociology of Facebook! says:

    [...] Facebook’s in-house sociologist, reports his findings about Facebook: The average male Facebook user with 120 friends: Leaves comments on 7 friends’ [...]

  73. Facebook Kullanıcılarının Sosyal Eğilimleri | Jnbn.Net says:

    [...] Kaynak: insidefacebook.com [...]

  74. Youth and Grass Routes 30 March 09 | mobileYouth - youth marketing mobile culture research says:

    [...] * Facebook’s “In-House Sociologist” Shares Stats on Users’ Social Behavior (Inside Facebook) * Brandwidth – do you have it? (Graham Brown mobileYouth) (Slideshare) * My Latest Ruby Pseudo [...]

  75. The Widening Gap between Dating Sites As The Market Matures says:

    [...] F­aceb­ook­’s­ “I­n­­-Hous­e S­oci­ologi­… [...]

  76. Sandberg Describes “Active Networks” on Facebook at AdAge Digital Conference says:

    [...] she called Facebook users’ “active networks,” framing some recently published data on Facebook users’ social behavior for the agencies, brands, and marketers in [...]

  77. Casey says:

    Why do we need a Sociologist to tell us this? To me, it’s common sense.

  78. Does your business have a digital face? « Tallahassee Digital Biz says:

    [...] those that have over 100 friends, most only communicate with a smaller subset of friends, and the rest is broadcasting to others. Now there’s not enough data presented to see if if content actually can still spread across [...]

  79. Laura says:

    Are these stats monthly, daily, annual. The stats do not make much sense if you do not provide a timeframe.

  80. Sociologija 2.0 - kiek laiko dar krapštysime nosį? « Mediana.lt says:

    [...] niekuomet nepasakytų gyvai (apie vartotojų elgseną šiame socialiniame tinkle galite plačiau paskaitinėti čia)? Kas skatina skirti galybę laiko rašinėjant komentarus interneto naujienų portaluose? Tai tik [...]

  81. Viisi syytä, jotka eivät aja Facebookia tuhoon « LEHMÄTKIN LENTÄIS says:

    [...] kompastu. On esitetty, että ihminen kykenee hallitsemaan kognitiivisesti n. 150 ihmissuhdetta. Ja Facebookin oman tutkijan mukaan käyttäjät viestivät aktiivisesti vain n. 5%:n kanssa kavereistaan. Tästä voidaan laskea, [...]

  82. Vic of BusinessAccent says:

    It just shows that women are more sociable than males. But I think it is for the reason that more male Facebook users are there to market rather than socialize. There are also more male bloggers than female blogger, I think.

  83. Juice Plus Vitamins says:

    Interesting Research, yes women are more sociable.

  84. Facebook Report Shows The Path To A Popular Page says:

    [...] conducted by Facebook’s “in-house sociologist” Cameron Marlow last year and presented in May at the International AAAI Conference on Weblogs and [...]

  85. Weekly Digest of the Social Networking Space: March 4, 2009 | Socialnetworkingsavvy.info-Articles Digest says:

    [...] Facebook users only interact with a few Despite those that have over 100 friends, most only communicate with a smaller subset of friends, and the rest is broadcasting to others. Now there’s not enough data presented to see if if content actually can still spread across [...]

  86. Sosiaaliset verkostot ja verkostoituminen « LEHMÄTKIN LENTÄIS says:

    [...] ihmisiä kaverilistallaan. Suurin osa virtuaalisista kaverisuhteista on kuitenkin löyhiä, sillä Facebookin oman tutkijan mukaan keskimääräinen käyttäjä, jolla on n. 120 kaveria, viestittelee aktiivisesti vain 5-10%:in [...]

  87. Facebook’s “In-House Sociologist” Shares Stats on Users’ Social Behavior | dbluco says:

    [...] From VN:F [1.6.3_896]please wait…Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)VN:F [1.6.3_896]Rating: 0 (from 0 votes) [...]

  88. Michael says:

    I know many months have passed since those stats were posted but I have never felt so average after looking at my own numbers.

  89. Always-on: Smartphones, 3G, and texting with Generation Y says:

    [...] Concerned about feeling out of the loop unless you’re constantly in touch with your friends? Don’t worry, unless you’re exceeding social contact with more than 10 people a day you’re just acclimating to the environment shared by the rest of  digital natives. Despite the fact that you’ve only got 50 Friends on Facebook you need to be aware that the numbers of close friends people keep in touch with is usually totally independent of this (most Facebooker’s only regularly exchange info with 5% or less of their Friends). [...]

  90. blog.benjaminr.info :: Facebook Social Media Social Media Social Media Policies Twitter YouTube :: Social Network Stats for 2009 says:

    [...] those that have over 100 friends, most only communicate with a smaller subset of friends, and the rest is broadcasting to others. Now there’s not enough data presented to see if if content actually can still spread across [...]

  91. Jackie says:

    gotta love it! I was just wondering how many of her 4, 851 FB “friends” this lady I saw on FB, could actually communicate with…or was she just racing to see who could get the most friends? LOL

  92. Term says:

    well, I believe that facebook is growing up stronger everyday

  93. Term says:

    well, I agree with this article… facebook is the best for social network

  94. Mobile tracker says:

    Informative, it would help us understand more and ponder on ourselves behavior.

  95. Sosiaalisia verkkoja tarkastelemassa « A Sizzling Blog says:

    [...] omiin palveluihinsa liittyen tutkimusta jo 2000-luvun alussa, ja esimerkiksi Facebook käyttää palvelun kehittämisen tukena sosiologian asiantuntijoita. Ei ole yllättävää, että sosiaalisten verkkojen analyysi (social network analysis, SNA) on [...]

  96. Chief Troublemaker Asks: Is It Time to Unfriend People in Your Social Networks? | Women Grow Business says:

    [...] Facebook, they are more than likely only interacting with a small subset of friends. Indeed, the Facebook sociologist says no matter how large their friend network: Facebook users tend to “comment on stuff from only [...]

  97. magdalen23 says:

    my favorite part of facebook is looking at the Live Feed and yes, actually interacting with the material and the people there. i usually pop in and just read the first screenful of status updates — and i love that it isn’t always the same people (i have about 800 FB friends).

    this gets me out of only talking to people i already know well. some guy i was in an art show with posted a cool Vimeo link! cool! an author i know fairly well posts every 3 minutes and now i feel closer to her because i know about how she cooks all day. i can click “like” or make a note to my cousin in LA whom i otherwise only talk with 3 times a year.

    if FB better promoted *continuing* conversations on status comments/posts, then we’d be talking about a much higher possibility of strengthening social ties. not sure people really want that, frankly. (usually people have to attach a link off-Facebook or off the status itself, to foment a real conversation that can emerge over the course of days, e.g. a link to their blog).

    discussing it as “networking” vs. “advertising oneself” is bullshit marketingspeak for the soulless.

  98. Science and Industry » Blog Archive » Looking at social networks says:

    [...] are the social networks we develop and document in the modern communication era. Services like Facebook, Twitter and Flickr are not just sharing content, it’s about the networks that are build in [...]

  99. jazzsequence » » How not to use Twitter says:

    [...] with those people.  It’s been proven in studies that Facebook users with hundreds of friends really only actually keep in touch with a small handful.  Our brain just can’t handle relationships in excess of  a few [...]

  100. tamaras says:

    I have a craving and desire for Facebook with feelings similar to that of a romantic love. Facebook has created so my many new friendships.

  101. Social networking vs. real life | Blueleaf Creative says:

    [...] Find out more here: insidefacebook.com [...]

  102. Week 4 – More Statistics on Social Networks « Omar's Blog says:

    [...] those that have over 100 friends, most only communicate with a smaller subset of friends, and the rest is broadcasting to others. Now there’s not enough data presented to see if if content actually can still spread across [...]

  103. Do You Really Need 500 Friends on That Social Network? Is It Time to Unfriend Some People? | The MatriX Files says:

    [...] Facebook, they are more than likely only interacting with a small subset of friends. Indeed, the Facebook sociologist says that no matter how large their friend network, Facebook users tend to “comment on stuff [...]

  104. Social Media Stats from 2009 says:

    [...] those that have over 100 friends, most only communicate with a smaller subset of friends, and the rest is broadcasting to others. Now there’s not enough data presented to see if if content actually can still spread across [...]

  105. Diseñando para la Interaccion Social « Docke: Blog says:

    [...] 3 The Economist article quoting stats from Cameron Marlow, sociologist at Facebook [...]

  106. How Many Friends can One Person Really Have? « Nick Valente says:

    [...] relationships”, is generally accepted to be about 150. In an interesting post from last year on Inside Facebook  they talk about an article in the Economist showing that people with 500 friends. In essence they [...]

  107. The Sociology of Social Media | Buzz Master's Blog says:

    [...] interesting blog I found through my search, was a report by Justin Smith quoting Cameron Marlow, Researcher for Facebook and written on February of 2009. (Notice that when [...]

  108. Life Without Facebook & 10 Reasons To Delete Your Facebook Account | Reed Manuel says:

    [...] you need more reasons to delete your facebook account, check out this article on just how much interaction people have on average on facebook… it’s eye opening. It shows you just how diluted social networking is. Posted in [...]

  109. Josh Constine says:

    @Earn: Thanks, but please link your posts to our coverage in the future. I think your site is important because many users are wondering how to earn Credits. You could improve by offering more side-by-side comparisons of the different options and giving your opinion as to what the easiest method is.

  110. Alyssa says:

    This is interesting stats! Ya women are more sociable than men, and they do this many times. Is this stats is daily, monthly or yearly??

  111. Lucus Murphy says:

    This was an interesting article. But sometimes I fail to understand to compulsory obsession with these social networks, sometimes seems more like a popularity contest. Through these networks I have begun to understand behavioral tendencies of people. However I also acknowledge people who use these networks for a professional use like the Customer centers on Twitter.

  112. Josh Constine says:

    @Lucus: The additional communication mediums social networks provide help users form a tighter community with their real friends.

  113. Whiskey Notes and Parachuting Fish » Human Nature vs. Behavior says:

    [...] users average between 120 – 500 “friends”, they only interact intimately with an average of 24, or 5-10% of friends. If you remove the outliers (i.e. @chrisbrogan) and Corporations (i.e. [...]

  114. Social networking vs. real life | Blueleaf says:

    [...] Find out more here: insidefacebook.com [...]

  115. 20/20 Vision: What Role for Social Media? « Discernable Futures says:

    [...] Facebook activity was closely correlated to meaningful face-to-face relationality. This echoes other findings about the more narrow scope of active Facebook affiliations, despite the number of “friends” a [...]

  116. El numero dunbar « Vicente Igual says:

    [...] un investigador científico de Facebook, compartió algunas estadísticas interesantes sobre los patrones de los usuarios de Facebook ‘el comportamiento [...]

  117. Abie Katz's Blog » Blog Archive » How to Help People Connect? says:

    [...] at the sociology of Facebook it is evident that most people only socialize with a very small group of people. There is nothing [...]

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