Two Years After Facebook Launches News Feed, Sociologists Describe “Ambient Awareness”

Today marks the two-year point since Facebook first introduced its “News Feed,” a new way of discovering information about your friends through an automatically “pushed” stream of updates about your friends’ activity on the site.

While hundreds of thousands of users initially protested the News Feed due to perceived privacy concerns, they have since voted with their feet and stayed glued: Facebook has grown from 15 million active users in September 2006 to over 100 million active users in September 2008.

Why have 100 million people decided they want to share more about themselves, and know more about their friends? While the answer likely involves deep thoughts from psychology and/or spirituality, depending on your perspective (I have a friend actually writing a book on this very topic), Clive Thompson at the NY Times has a nice piece coming in tomorrow’s Sunday Magazine that explains the broader sociological effects of services like Facebook’s News Feed and Twitter, describing our new and future world as one filled with “ambient awareness.”

Thompson writes (emphasis mine),

In essence, Facebook users didn’t think they wanted constant, up-to-the-minute updates on what other people are doing. Yet when they experienced this sort of omnipresent knowledge, they found it intriguing and addictive. Why?

Social scientists have a name for this sort of incessant online contact. They call it “ambient awareness.” It is, they say, very much like being physically near someone and picking up on his mood through the little things he does — body language, sighs, stray comments — out of the corner of your eye. Facebook is no longer alone in offering this sort of interaction online. In the last year, there has been a boom in tools for “microblogging”: posting frequent tiny updates on what you’re doing. The phenomenon is quite different from what we normally think of as blogging, because a blog post is usually a written piece, sometimes quite long: a statement of opinion, a story, an analysis. But these new updates are something different. They’re far shorter, far more frequent and less carefully considered.

For many people — particularly anyone over the age of 30 — the idea of describing your blow-by-blow activities in such detail is absurd. Why would you subject your friends to your daily minutiae? And conversely, how much of their trivia can you absorb? The growth of ambient intimacy can seem like modern narcissism taken to a new, supermetabolic extreme — the ultimate expression of a generation of celebrity-addled youths who believe their every utterance is fascinating and ought to be shared with the world. Twitter, in particular, has been the subject of nearly relentless scorn since it went online. “Who really cares what I am doing, every hour of the day?” wondered Alex Beam, a Boston Globe columnist, in an essay about Twitter last month. “Even I don’t care.”…

But as the days went by, something changed. Haley discovered that he was beginning to sense the rhythms of his friends’ lives in a way he never had before. When one friend got sick with a virulent fever, he could tell by her Twitter updates when she was getting worse and the instant she finally turned the corner. He could see when friends were heading into hellish days at work or when they’d scored a big success. Even the daily catalog of sandwiches became oddly mesmerizing, a sort of metronomic click that he grew accustomed to seeing pop up in the middle of each day.

This is the paradox of ambient awareness. Each little update — each individual bit of social information — is insignificant on its own, even supremely mundane. But taken together, over time, the little snippets coalesce into a surprisingly sophisticated portrait of your friends’ and family members’ lives, like thousands of dots making a pointillist painting. This was never before possible, because in the real world, no friend would bother to call you up and detail the sandwiches she was eating. The ambient information becomes like “a type of E.S.P.,” as Haley described it to me, an invisible dimension floating over everyday life.

Nearing the conclusion, Thompson continues,

This is the ultimate effect of the new awareness: It brings back the dynamics of small-town life, where everybody knows your business. Young people at college are the ones to experience this most viscerally, because, with more than 90 percent of their peers using Facebook, it is especially difficult for them to opt out…

“It’s just like living in a village, where it’s actually hard to lie because everybody knows the truth already,” Tufekci said. “The current generation is never unconnected. They’re never losing touch with their friends. So we’re going back to a more normal place, historically. If you look at human history, the idea that you would drift through life, going from new relation to new relation, that’s very new. It’s just the 20th century.”

Psychologists and sociologists spent years wondering how humanity would adjust to the anonymity of life in the city, the wrenching upheavals of mobile immigrant labor — a world of lonely people ripped from their social ties. We now have precisely the opposite problem. Indeed, our modern awareness tools reverse the original conceit of the Internet. When cyberspace came along in the early ’90s, it was celebrated as a place where you could reinvent your identity — become someone new.

“If anything, it’s identity-constraining now,” Tufekci told me. “You can’t play with your identity if your audience is always checking up on you. I had a student who posted that she was downloading some Pearl Jam, and someone wrote on her wall, ‘Oh, right, ha-ha — I know you, and you’re not into that.’ ” She laughed. “You know that old cartoon? ‘On the Internet, nobody knows you’re a dog’? On the Internet today, everybody knows you’re a dog! If you don’t want people to know you’re a dog, you’d better stay away from a keyboard.”

In addition, the proliferation of social applications has drastically increased the volume of ambient information flow within social platforms. One of the most rewarding aspects of being a social platform application developer is seeing large numbers of real people use services you’ve created for every day communication. Whether playing Scrabble or cheering on your favorite team, social applications meaningfully contribute to the ability of millions of people to know their friends and neighbors every day, largely due to services like Facebook’s News Feed.

While it is certainly true that only certain types of communication can happen in environments like Facebook and Twitter – most people choose not to post deeply personal or vulnerable content – I strongly believe that a world where this kind of information sharing occurs is much better than one without!

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Leave a Reply

5 Responses to “Two Years After Facebook Launches News Feed, Sociologists Describe “Ambient Awareness””

  1. links for 2008-09-07 - Kevin Bondelli’s Youth Vote Blog says:

    [...] Inside Facebook » Two Years After Facebook Launches News Feed, Sociologists Describe “Ambient Awa… [...]

  2. Guy says:

    Thanks for this, great article.

  3. woody121 says:

    great article – this sort of concept is really interesting – more and more we see technolog radically chaning how society interacts.

  4. Facebook: a”Petri Dick for the Social Sciences” « My Sociological Imagination says:

    [...] http://www.insidefacebook.com/2008/09/06/two-years-after-facebook-launches-news-feed-sociologists-de… [...]

  5. Cindy says:

    As a sociologist myself I do find facebook interesting, but sometimes it gets out of hand and a bit ridiculous. Do we really need to know every move, and thought, about a person. With all this information even the non-pros can put together a profile about a person (personility) Maybe this is a good thing, but sometimes I think it goes a bit to far. Sociologists can have a field day with this kind of information.

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